We draw conclusions based upon how the information is presented—not the actual information itself.

An ad for cream cheese that states 95% fat free is more likely to convince us than one that says it contains 5% fat.

The facts are identical but it is the positive spin not the concrete evidence that drives the appeal.

One of the greatest threats we face is simply put – bullshit.

We’re drowning in it. We’re drowning in rhetoric that is just true enough not to be a lie.

Bob Hoffman on The Golden Age of Bullshit citing speechwriter John Lovett

Rather than simply stating the facts most advertisers typically embed their message into creative contextual devices that evoke feelings and bypass rational resistance.

This is why advertisers use stories, poems, slogans, songs, jokes, pictures, symbols, characters, roles, and metaphors.

They are particularly ripe marketing tools, because they lead the imagination and evoke the feelings that strike at our heart not our head.

We make assumptions about the world around us based on sometimes incomplete or false information.

Start With Why by Simon Sinek

The conscious mind will leap to conclusions, forming a coherent narrative based upon partial information.

This strong tendency to draw conclusions from incomplete information is a cognitive rule called ‘what you see is all there is.’

Consistency and coherence, not quantity or quality of information, are the keys to forming opinions.

7 unconscious errors we make when buying brands by Douglas Van Praet citing Daniel Kahneman

Confidence depends on the quality of the story they can tell. So it’s not surprising that one of the hottest new forms of advertising is ‘Branded Content.’

Increasingly advertisers are choosing to spend their investments often in the form of entertaining stories that blur the line between conventional advertising and entertainment.

We might enjoy these new forms of advertising better, but we also may become more influenced by them without ever knowing why.

7 unconscious errors we make when buying brands by Douglas Van Praet citing Daniel Kahneman

We are convinced by advertising based on consistency and coherence, not the quality and quantity of information.

The best ad campaigns involve a simple clear emotionally evocative idea repeated over and over again.

Less is in fact more.

Manipulation works.

Every manipulative tactic can indeed help influence behavior and help a company become quite successful.

But there are trade-offs. Not a single one of them breeds loyalty.

Over the course of time, they cost more and more. The gains are only short-term.

If you have exceptionally deep pockets and are looking to achieve only with no consideration for the long run, then these strategies and tactics are perfect.

Start With Why by Simon Sinek

Manipulative techniques have become such a mainstay in American business today that it has become virtually impossible for some to kick the habit.

Start With Why by Simon Sinek

It appears that the conscious mind recognizes what it has seen before and, because it is familiar, can process it more fluently, which creates the feeling of liking something more.

Unconscious familiarity breeds affection!

Consumer.ology by Philip Graves

People watching a televised political debate were heavily swayed by what they believed other people thought about the candidates’ performance.

Consumer.ology by Philip Graves