The research interview process does more than merely ignore critical components of why people behave as they do, it changes how and what they think.

Consumer.ology by Philip Graves

Moments of discovery are often accompanied by surprised laughter;

when I heard laughter he could took it as a cue that there might be something going on that was worth looking at.

Consumer.ology by Philip Graves citing former dean of Yale Medical School, Lewis Thomas

Laughter itself is a very useful behavioral reference point.

Most people can distinguish genuine laughter from artificially forced good humor if they put their mind to it.

Consumer.ology by Philip Graves

Asking a consumer about something overrides the natural state that thing occupies in his or her experience.

It’s very hard to preempt what people will find interesting or attention worthy – which makes it very risky to presume by asking them a question about it.

When research has put a focus on the issue it’s investigating that causes people to consider it in a way they otherwise wouldn’t, it has manufactured the response it gets.

Consumer.ology by Philip Graves

Learning where online customers skip through content or that they fail to reach potentially important information at the bottom of a page can enable specific weaknesses to be identified.

Consumer.ology by Philip Graves