Of course, the danger is that your passion spills over into obsession and you become a bore.

Nobody wants to be one of those.

I work in advertising but I don’t live it.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

Storytelling is the most powerful form of communication ever invented.

Through stories we learn, entertain, communicate, and socialize with each other.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

Juxtaposition is the art of placing together a number of contrasting objects or ideas, usually two.

Used effectively, it captures our imaginations immediately, making it one of the most valuable techniques any creater can employ to dramatize their message.

And it’s at its most potent when these two objects are as diametrically opposed to each other as possible.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

When you are intent on putting a great wrong right, creativity will often exceed all expectations.

Out of conflict comes purpose.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

For most of us, anger amounts to stress, and the worst type of stress at that.

But for artists, anger can be a positive force.

If focused and channeled into a piece of work, it is capable of producing something of great profundity.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

When I’m asked, ‘When do you do your best thinking?’ My answer is always, ‘When I’m not thinking.’

That is why a brainstorming session is a complete and utter waste of time for the truly creative person.

Creativity doesn’t work like that. Too much thinking jeopardizes the creative process.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

You can’t be good at everything. The skill is to work with someone who is good at what you are not.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

Facebook’s pages platform reaches only six percent of a brand’s followers; and it’s headed down to one to two percent.

If businesses want to make sure that people see their content, the best strategy is, and always has been, paid advertising.

The Golden Age of Bullshit by Bob Hoffman citing Time Magazine and a Facebook spokesperson for Time Magazine

When you’re trying something new, you’re in a very vulnerable place.

You’re not even sure if it’s the right thing to do.

Snap judgments and rapid decisions often lead to poor work.

The ability to stand back from your thinking and give it what we call ‘the overnight test’ is essential.

Unfortunately, we live in a world today that too often doesn’t allow this.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

In advertising, the best partnerships are usually those formed between art director and writer. The reason for this is in their job titles:

Art directors think visually.

Writers think in terms of narrative.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

At the foundation of any great idea is the truth, and the most powerful force of creativity.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

We draw conclusions based upon how the information is presented—not the actual information itself.

An ad for cream cheese that states 95% fat free is more likely to convince us than one that says it contains 5% fat.

The facts are identical but it is the positive spin not the concrete evidence that drives the appeal.

One of the greatest threats we face is simply put – bullshit.

We’re drowning in it. We’re drowning in rhetoric that is just true enough not to be a lie.

Bob Hoffman on The Golden Age of Bullshit citing speechwriter John Lovett

The people LEAST likely to engage deeply are the MOST important for growth.

There is a way out of this paradox. But it requires us to embrace two principles:

1) Battle for interest, not attention

2)Fans are actors, not the audience

The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel

Any great work, regardless of medium, is almost certainly expressing a distinct point of view.

But if that point of view doesn’t contain a truth, then you can bet that the work’s impact will be fleeting.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

Rather than simply stating the facts most advertisers typically embed their message into creative contextual devices that evoke feelings and bypass rational resistance.

This is why advertisers use stories, poems, slogans, songs, jokes, pictures, symbols, characters, roles, and metaphors.

They are particularly ripe marketing tools, because they lead the imagination and evoke the feelings that strike at our heart not our head.

Don’t ever work in advertising.

‘I work in advertising; I sell Doritos.’ ‘Fuck OFF!’

Advertising is most successful when it seeks to increase penetration, not loyalty.

The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel citing Charles Graham

Creativity isn’t an objective pursuit. Its value can’t be measured the way other skills can be.

Eventually, of course, its value will be confirmed, but often long after it was created.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH