To create great work you should be making up your own beliefs as you go along, changing them one day to the next, always pushing against the boundaries of current thinking, trying to escape the confines of conventional wisdom.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

The research interview process does more than merely ignore critical components of why people behave as they do, it changes how and what they think.

Consumer.ology by Philip Graves

We draw conclusions based upon how the information is presented—not the actual information itself.

An ad for cream cheese that states 95% fat free is more likely to convince us than one that says it contains 5% fat.

The facts are identical but it is the positive spin not the concrete evidence that drives the appeal.

One of the great problems of (advertising) is how oblivious we are to our own prejudices and our own illogical behaviors.

We seem to be able to recognize it in everyone but ourselves.

Rather than simply stating the facts most advertisers typically embed their message into creative contextual devices that evoke feelings and bypass rational resistance.

This is why advertisers use stories, poems, slogans, songs, jokes, pictures, symbols, characters, roles, and metaphors.

They are particularly ripe marketing tools, because they lead the imagination and evoke the feelings that strike at our heart not our head.