People learn by comparison.

They learn by comparing new things to the things they already know. That’s why redefining a category is much easier than creating a new one.

When you position your product in an existing category you’re essentially saying “it’s like something you already know but better”.

When you try to create a new product category you’re essentially saying “it’s like nothing you’ve ever seen before”.

That’s a provocative statement, but hard to learn by.

Do small things with great love.

Constantly chopping and changing your specialty will hinder your success.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

Respect don’t revere.

Putting anyone on a pedestal is dangerous. It implies they’re better than everyone else; but they’re not.

We’re all stepping-stones for the next generation.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

Stay open to new ideas, new places, and new people will feed your creative soul.

Lack of inspiration may be just another way of saying lack of experience.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

Storytelling is the most powerful form of communication ever invented.

Through stories we learn, entertain, communicate, and socialize with each other.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

For most of us, anger amounts to stress, and the worst type of stress at that.

But for artists, anger can be a positive force.

If focused and channeled into a piece of work, it is capable of producing something of great profundity.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

When I’m asked, ‘When do you do your best thinking?’ My answer is always, ‘When I’m not thinking.’

That is why a brainstorming session is a complete and utter waste of time for the truly creative person.

Creativity doesn’t work like that. Too much thinking jeopardizes the creative process.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

When we have strong positive emotions about a brand we seek supporting evidence and ignore contradictory facts.

Our rational mind is always looking for evidence to support our dominant beliefs…

the stronger the emotion, the stronger the belief, and the greater the tendency to seek out supporting evidence.

This confirmatory bias is why we often overlook the flaws of the ones we love, even if that loved one is a brand.

We focus our attention on the positive qualities of the brand while ignoring the deficiencies.

When you’re trying something new, you’re in a very vulnerable place.

You’re not even sure if it’s the right thing to do.

At the foundation of any great idea is the truth, and the most powerful force of creativity.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

When people buy T-shirts just for the logo on it, it shows how much people care for that brand – and is another source of revenue for the company.

Brand Jam by Marc Gobé

Any great work, regardless of medium, is almost certainly expressing a distinct point of view.

But if that point of view doesn’t contain a truth, then you can bet that the work’s impact will be fleeting.

Hegarty on Creativity by Sir John Hegaty of BBH

Naming is one of the most important parts of a branding strategy.

Brand Jam by Marc Gobé

One of the problems with advertising experts is that they have a free pass.

They go around to conferences, they talk to the press, they write stupid blogs, and they make profound and confident statements about the advertising industry.

And no one ever goes back and checks up on them.

The purpose of marketing is not merely to secure the attention, participation and purchases of the fans alone.

Brands depend on retaining and attracting legions of buyers who don’t know our brand well, and don’t buy it very often.

The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel

Customer touchpoint opportunities are proliferating faster than brands can adapt.

With so many platforms on offer, only those brands that pair their products with well-designed services will retain consumers’ affection.

This is blurring the lines between products and services.

James Deakin. Fjord. “Five key technology trends that will hange our lives this year” warc sub req’d (via peterspear)

Advertising works by a process of Unconscious Behaviorism.

We are being conditioned by the media on a deep unconscious level and it is this implicit associative emotional conditioning that drives our brand preferences.

We make decisions by emotional association more so than rational analysis.

Typography is important because it carries the message of a brand.

Very often you can tell what a brand is going to say to you just by looking at the typography before you even read the words.