When we have strong positive emotions about a brand we seek supporting evidence and ignore contradictory facts.

Our rational mind is always looking for evidence to support our dominant beliefs…

the stronger the emotion, the stronger the belief, and the greater the tendency to seek out supporting evidence.

This confirmatory bias is why we often overlook the flaws of the ones we love, even if that loved one is a brand.

We focus our attention on the positive qualities of the brand while ignoring the deficiencies.

We draw conclusions based upon how the information is presented—not the actual information itself.

An ad for cream cheese that states 95% fat free is more likely to convince us than one that says it contains 5% fat.

The facts are identical but it is the positive spin not the concrete evidence that drives the appeal.

Rather than simply stating the facts most advertisers typically embed their message into creative contextual devices that evoke feelings and bypass rational resistance.

This is why advertisers use stories, poems, slogans, songs, jokes, pictures, symbols, characters, roles, and metaphors.

They are particularly ripe marketing tools, because they lead the imagination and evoke the feelings that strike at our heart not our head.

The more we are exposed to a brand the more we like it.

The number one drive in human behavior and biology is homeostasis, or the seeking of the same stable, balanced, predictable state.

All consumers find a great deal of comfort and pleasure in what is known and familiar.

You can be conditioned through advertising to choose logically inferior options.

We can even become conditioned to find great pleasure in things that harm us.

Advertising works by a process of Unconscious Behaviorism.

We are being conditioned by the media on a deep unconscious level and it is this implicit associative emotional conditioning that drives our brand preferences.

We make decisions by emotional association more so than rational analysis.

The conscious mind will leap to conclusions, forming a coherent narrative based upon partial information.

This strong tendency to draw conclusions from incomplete information is a cognitive rule called ‘what you see is all there is.’

Consistency and coherence, not quantity or quality of information, are the keys to forming opinions.

7 unconscious errors we make when buying brands by Douglas Van Praet citing Daniel Kahneman

Recognizing the irrationality of our decisions can help us make more informed, sensible choices and save money.

Confidence depends on the quality of the story they can tell. So it’s not surprising that one of the hottest new forms of advertising is ‘Branded Content.’

Increasingly advertisers are choosing to spend their investments often in the form of entertaining stories that blur the line between conventional advertising and entertainment.

We might enjoy these new forms of advertising better, but we also may become more influenced by them without ever knowing why.

7 unconscious errors we make when buying brands by Douglas Van Praet citing Daniel Kahneman

We are convinced by advertising based on consistency and coherence, not the quality and quantity of information.

The best ad campaigns involve a simple clear emotionally evocative idea repeated over and over again.

Less is in fact more.

We make decisions based upon the memories of our experiences — not the actual experiences.

How we feel about a brand largely depends upon our memory of the experience provided by the brand, not what actually happened.

These are not based on the reality of these experiences but almost entirely on the peak moments and the concluding impression — whether positive or negative—the brand has produced.

Not only do brands transform our beliefs and experiences, we feel even better about a product just because it costs more.

That’s because experience has taught us that things that are expensive are usually higher quality.

When we think about buying something we automatically dredge up all of our past impressions and summarize the brand’s worth in the form of gut feelings—good, bad, or indifferent.

The sum total of these feelings is what advertisers call Brand Equity.

We don’t remember all the experiences just the overall impression.

Brands add value not in the product but rather within our minds.

That’s because our enjoyment is shaped by our expectations and these are molded by our memories.