When we have strong positive emotions about a brand we seek supporting evidence and ignore contradictory facts.

Our rational mind is always looking for evidence to support our dominant beliefs…

the stronger the emotion, the stronger the belief, and the greater the tendency to seek out supporting evidence.

This confirmatory bias is why we often overlook the flaws of the ones we love, even if that loved one is a brand.

We focus our attention on the positive qualities of the brand while ignoring the deficiencies.

We draw conclusions based upon how the information is presented—not the actual information itself.

An ad for cream cheese that states 95% fat free is more likely to convince us than one that says it contains 5% fat.

The facts are identical but it is the positive spin not the concrete evidence that drives the appeal.

Rather than simply stating the facts most advertisers typically embed their message into creative contextual devices that evoke feelings and bypass rational resistance.

This is why advertisers use stories, poems, slogans, songs, jokes, pictures, symbols, characters, roles, and metaphors.

They are particularly ripe marketing tools, because they lead the imagination and evoke the feelings that strike at our heart not our head.

The more we are exposed to a brand the more we like it.

The number one drive in human behavior and biology is homeostasis, or the seeking of the same stable, balanced, predictable state.

All consumers find a great deal of comfort and pleasure in what is known and familiar.