Participation isn’t enough.

Having a more clear-sighted view on people’s real world buying behaviours and thus which consumers actually matter to the generation of revenue and profit begins to gives us a framework for thinking about participation.

The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel

Our rational mind is always looking for evidence to support our dominant beliefs…

the stronger the emotion, the stronger the belief, and the greater the tendency to seek out supporting evidence.

This confirmatory bias is why we often overlook the flaws of the ones we love, even if that loved one is a brand.

We focus our attention on the positive qualities of the brand while ignoring the deficiencies.

When people buy T-shirts just for the logo on it, it shows how much people care for that brand – and is another source of revenue for the company.

Brand Jam by Marc Gobé

Advertising is most successful when it seeks to increase penetration, not loyalty.

The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel citing Charles Graham

The more we are exposed to a brand the more we like it.

The number one drive in human behavior and biology is homeostasis, or the seeking of the same stable, balanced, predictable state.

All consumers find a great deal of comfort and pleasure in what is known and familiar.