Participation isn’t enough.

Having a more clear-sighted view on people’s real world buying behaviours and thus which consumers actually matter to the generation of revenue and profit begins to gives us a framework for thinking about participation.

The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel

Our rational mind is always looking for evidence to support our dominant beliefs…

the stronger the emotion, the stronger the belief, and the greater the tendency to seek out supporting evidence.

This confirmatory bias is why we often overlook the flaws of the ones we love, even if that loved one is a brand.

We focus our attention on the positive qualities of the brand while ignoring the deficiencies.

When people buy T-shirts just for the logo on it, it shows how much people care for that brand – and is another source of revenue for the company.

Brand Jam by Marc Gobé

Advertising is most successful when it seeks to increase penetration, not loyalty.

The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel citing Charles Graham

The more we are exposed to a brand the more we like it.

The number one drive in human behavior and biology is homeostasis, or the seeking of the same stable, balanced, predictable state.

All consumers find a great deal of comfort and pleasure in what is known and familiar.

The importance of occasional buyers who don’t buy you often and aren’t devoted to you is further underlined when you look at which consumers matter most to brand growth.

To grow, you need to recruit lots more new users who buy you just occasionally.

The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel

Design is about solving problems that humans have, not problems that products have.

Mills Baker. “Designer Duds” (via peterspear)

Emotional strategies based on a sincere promise cost less than others, since you build a loyalty with your guests that helps to avoid larger communications dollars.

Brand Jam by Marc Gobé

Playing the price game can come at tremendous cost and can create a significant dilemma for the company.

The short-term gain is fantastic, but the more you do it, the harder it becomes to kick the habit.

Once buyers get used to paying a lower-than-average price for a product or service, it is very hard to get them to pay more.

Start With Why by Simon Sinek

The conscious mind will leap to conclusions, forming a coherent narrative based upon partial information.

This strong tendency to draw conclusions from incomplete information is a cognitive rule called ‘what you see is all there is.’

Consistency and coherence, not quantity or quality of information, are the keys to forming opinions.

7 unconscious errors we make when buying brands by Douglas Van Praet citing Daniel Kahneman

There are only two ways to influence human behavior:

– You can manipulate it
– You can inspire it

Start With Why by Simon Sinek

Most people aren’t exclusively loyal.

Most people aren’t devoted to a single brand and are very happy to buy regularly from a range of brands.

They have their loyalties. But they are polygamously loyal.

And this is reflected in buying patterns – brands share their customers with other brands, and they do so roughly in line with their market shares.

The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel

Confidence depends on the quality of the story they can tell. So it’s not surprising that one of the hottest new forms of advertising is ‘Branded Content.’

Increasingly advertisers are choosing to spend their investments often in the form of entertaining stories that blur the line between conventional advertising and entertainment.

We might enjoy these new forms of advertising better, but we also may become more influenced by them without ever knowing why.

7 unconscious errors we make when buying brands by Douglas Van Praet citing Daniel Kahneman

Learning where online customers skip through content or that they fail to reach potentially important information at the bottom of a page can enable specific weaknesses to be identified.

Consumer.ology by Philip Graves

Emotional identities start with a well-communicated personal dream.

How can you make people dream if you are not a dreamer yourself?

Brand Jam by Marc Gobé

Identifying how long visitors to a site spend on each page can reveal how well it is serving its function of helping them find their ultimate destination on the site and how engaged they find it when they get there.

Consumer.ology by Philip Graves

Most people don’t know your brand very well.

Half of all brand knowledge is concentrated amongst 20% of buyers and the remainder is spread thinly across the remaining 80% of buyers.

So it emerges that a few people know a lot about your brand. And a great many more people know something about your brand.

The Participation Paradox by Martin Weigel

In an increasingly crowded marketplace, fools will compete on price.

Winners will find a way to create lasting value in the customer’s mind.

Tom Peters. Quoted here: “Why You Must Prove Your Brand Has Asset Value” by David Aaker (via peterspear)

Loyalty is when people are willing to turn down a better product or a better price to continue doing business with you.

Loyal customers often don’t even bother to research the competition or entertain other options.

Loyalty is not easily won.

Start With Why by Simon Sinek

Depth of character is absolutely counterintuitive for brands, which usually champion one or two attributes and miss out on chances to humanize themselves and captivate consumers.